All posts by Leslie Chadwell

How I came to understand the handling of disease.

 

How I came to understand the handling of disease.

I wanted to give you a a synapsis of a bigger blog I’m writing , that kind of got away from me as I think I used it to vent . It may not get put out there… it’s good but it does go on a bit.

So for the sake of clarification, I offer you this bit of clarity I found in understanding disease – specifically cancer.

Imagine you and your body just going along, everything seems fine, but a couple things are causing you some minor issues. You treat them or maybe ignore them as they aren’t really in your way yet. Maybe you see a Dr , take med’s, OTC’s or whatever and get through the issue by passing it over – not really addressing the root cause. God forbid we should miss a beat in this fast pace world.

Now relate that to your horses if you have them, or other animals. We go along and in our own little world we think it’s all good. We notice a couple instances where our horse gets a bit pushy, or has an attitude. Lots of people try to carrot their way out of things , instead of correcting it and setting a standard. They don’t want to have the horse not like them because they were mean. (Don’t deprive yourself of things you want even if you know they are not good for you). It’s easier, but is it?

Just this morning while feeding my colt, he got very anxious to eat and if I let that type of behavior go, he will grow to think he can just be a feisty boy and not learn to wait till his feed is placed. I say it is ok to come forward with manners, but not barge. Big life lessons! Sure it takes a bit of time, less than a minute!

Time passes and say you don’t do as I do and let things go thinking “oh he is just a baby” … well babies grow up! They don’t have to be a baby either – this is more often seen by me in well established horses, 6-12 yrs old. You live with them, you really don’t see anything as a potential issue to build for future, and don’t have time to correct anyway. Or do you??? It takes less time to pull a baby weed sprout than a full grow dandelion.

Now back to disease..

So we are going along busy busy and with out thinking really about our body speaking, we just keep taking on new symptom or old symptom getting louder. Typically we take more Otc”s for example and go along. Instant gratification. Got forbid we should stop and think. Again does it take less time now or later?? Hmm….

Time lapse… a couple yrs down the road you finally have an issue you can’t control with OTC’s or prescription stuff. Hmm ?? Dr take another x-ray, hmm? lets get a better look, we see something but we will run a CT Scan.

Results! Take you out at the knees! You have allowed parts of your body become Left Brain dominant ( quietly maneuvering for a dominant positions, stubborn, don’t like to be made to go), and take over as they have not had any instruction, or direction otherwise towards health and the balance.

Dodging OTC’s, and drugs along the way that masked the underlying issues of a whole system /body imbalance- Dis -Ease!

Getting the picture!

Your horse one day when you have a wonderful day in spring to take some time to pay attention to them, and they say, screw you! And Bam. You’re on the ground or if your lucky just had the you know what scared out of you with a display of dominant behavior.
“You want me to behave now? Listen to you now? You ignored me with my whispers now I’m screaming! You never gave me any idea you were leading before, so you’re on my turf now.”

This was my revelation a couple weeks ago as I did stalls and tried to get my head around the health crisis my family is now enduring. Somethings take longer to catch on but bottom line is when your body or your horse is injured and brushed over for too long eventually you will be called to put your big girl/boy pants on and face the music you and only you created.

Horse behavior and disease let go are both dominant bad boys! Why? lack of clear communication and time put in to keep the lines of communication open.

Then you have an issue and all of a sudden you need to step up and assume responsibility for that you have created in you and or your horse.

That’s harder than dealing with it as it comes and finding the root cause. Boredom, poor diet, emotional stressor, etc etc.

Take some time to breathe and think and in the end issues will tap on the door, not knock it down and run you over, because you didn’t take the time to listen. With horses, I say “listen with your eyes”, with your body – feel! It’s simple, every day it speaks to you… just listen.

What we create we can dismantle, and release. Whether it be self inflicted or environmental, a issue can be released and detox can happen , with time and clear communication.

Funny, I was just down in the barn doing my stalls thinking back to this post and ralised soemthign else. This whole thought process can be attributed to raiising our kids too.  That is a whole other topic of which I have an opinion. LOL

Be well~

 

 

 

 

 

Changing up the herd; New dynamics needed for teaching

The other day I decided to change things up in the herd in order to keep the youngster now 7 months in line and still learning herd dynamics and body language.  His good buddy , Mr, Bill,  I think is getting worn down by him. He gives him some discipline but not as it was and the little guy is now infringing on his personal space a bit too much for my liking.

I hesitated my change as it meant bringing in  a mare, not mom , of course , but Grandma! My alpha.

I  remember hearing for young geldings it is best to keep them with good solid geldings to keep them in place.  So far it has done so . Troubadour has a pal in Popeye but not a buddy. He has a buddy in Bill. Pop looks at Tru and he backs off. A tail swish and he flies! That’s what I’m looking for. The respect level he had for Bill is waining. Bill always alowed him in but he had to ask permission. That  is not so much any more.

My first thought was to move Pop to shed with Sarah, and bring Granny down. Granny is a toughy. Total alpha mare. She has a soft side which I saw with  Tru earlier but Im hoping she will see he needs to be put in his place more now. When I began to see the disregard Tru was having for Bill and infringing in his personal space, with no retort, I knew I needed to change things up.

So pony away for a break to shed with the Sarah, and Granny to the rescue. Pop likes having D , ( Granny) around as she is alpha in the herd. He has no issues with following her lead.

So far the change is great for all. Pony is in heaven and in peace! Sarah is content. Pop has his real leader, though pony too is alpha but not over D!  D is patient with Tru but  is not letting him infringe at all.  He is learning the subtle cues  she gives. Between she and Popeye he is learning a lot and will make my job a bit easier as he progresses.

Softness and play

I was inspired with the sun out the other day to go for a ride. The arena is open sided from kick wall up . We have clear span curtains that drop down and allows wonderful natural light in and with the sun it is like a green house. Cold is cold but its warming still. I Took Pop to the ring, not his favorite place to be so I wanted to make it special. We did out regular warm up. He had his roll etc and we moved at liberty . After liberty warm up we went online for a bit of lateral work , tracking up on circles etc. I had an idea of point to point that we hadnt done in a while. I had some various cookies and grain with me . I placed them in vairous places , on things etc. so go was with a purpose and it didnt take him long to figure out why he was going. It was funny to see him perk up at every thing to see if he had a treasure. Defintily peeked his curiosity. Our walk was effortless. As i ran out of treats first time round , I got off and relenished. Kind a cool. Inbetween goodie points I would add a point of rest. I would add variety to these. We would stand, or lateral flex L/R or lateral flex and then move our hind end around. I am in awe of his softeness. Litterally I go to slide to take and he is there. He is so tuned in! If I move an inch, litterally he is right there. So much more receptive. I have to Thank the real study to the Buck DVD clinic series for the added pieces to my puzzle.
Popeye is very much an introvert so short and sweet is great for him. My short and sweets are now so productive its truly amazing. I look forwrd to raising Tru in this mannor. Soft, clear and very purposeful. The slightly different style of work online seems to be a huge factor going forward for me. I appreciate the ablity to be open to diferent learning styles. I feel it is important when dealing with any thing or one. Not all beings learn alike. I like having different styles to pull from in Quiver.

Response to Literature part 2…. My opinion continues.

Part 2 of NH article response :

 

Nevertheless, NH is used to distinguish one form of horse training from more traditional styles of horsemanship. But I think this is again just a marketing strategy. It’s almost impossible to pin point anything that makes NH different from most traditional training systems.

(i) both NH and traditional use negative reinforcement principles.

 

(ii) both NH and traditional are based on (a) flooding techniques; and (b) approach and retreat techniques.

 

(iii) both NH and traditional rely on ever increasing amounts of pressure to make a horse respond.

 

There differences between most NH trainers and most traditional trainers are superficial and just around the fringes – such as the type of equipment. But even here it is hard to distinguish the two. For example, many people believe that NH does not use gadgets, but Monty Roberts is considered an NH trainer and he uses the buckstopper. Also, many people believe that NH trainers use rope halters, but Mark Rashid uses web halters and John O’Leary (who calls himself a traditional style trainer) promotes the use of rope halters in training. You could tally a list of gear that many people feel belong in one camp or the other and discover that there are trainers of either persuasion that use the same equipment.

Equipment or gadgets

Yes everyone has tools they prefer to work with. It is not a crime either if they are business savvy and market them.  I say God bless them. This is America. Lets go back to the most natural horsemen , The Native Americans.  They to had tools of choice, simple and effective but tools just the same.  Tools  are not the criminals here, it is the hands that use them that need to be held accountable.

 

(i) both NH and traditional use negative reinforcement principles.”

Hmm?? All I can say to this is a horse doesn’t stand a chance if we label ourselves as using Negative Reinforcement. I dare say some of my more Ttouch  and Clicker friends would be up in arms. 

I am really not sure what to say to this but that “Attitude is everything.”

 

(ii) both NH and traditional are based on (a) flooding techniques; and (b) approach and retreat techniques.”

Hmm? Re (a): I’m not sure of at all. My practice and learning through personal interaction and visual aids( DVD’s- books, etc), does not in any way BASE anything on Flooding. It is not a practice all horses can learn from. Some need to be taught while we watch paint dry. Others may be able to handle the faster pace of multi tasking, and more stimulus. This is my idea of flooding. But to say “Flooding” is a base of building foundation, No, sorry not on my clock, and not on the time pieces of any I have studied under in the NH world. The picture which goes with this article I guess is a form of “Flooding”. In my eyes, honestly, that is “Breaking”, breaking the spirit, there is a huge difference. Again I feel the attitude of the horse person has a lot to do with how things go forward. In my opinion, you can flood and stimulate thinking and connection, or you can flood and cause angst. All in the hands of the handler.

In regards to ( b), approach and retreat... you bet. Release teaches! The key is the release whether  it be physical contact or energetic intent, when a response is seen, the slightest glimmer , the release must happen.

Before I go on, I will say these are my opinions.  I am really just enjoying the opportunity the article has given me to really dissect my own thoughts and beliefs . This is very stimulating, heady stuff. 

 

(iii) both NH and traditional rely on ever increasing amounts of pressure to make a horse respond.”

Yes, to a certain extent. Better to apply pressure in increasing amounts until a response is seen, than kick to go, pull to stop. The key is the release. No news flash here right?

“….make a horse respond.” The word “Make” bothers me.  Anyone can make or try to make a horse comply, but where is any horsemanship in that?

I’m not sure how much traditional , old school English, practiced this. I was raised traditional English Equitation and do not recall any variation in pressure being taught. This was quite a few yrs ago!( 70′s)  Things were very mechanical. As I got older and developed my own style, and began to do more X/C work , fox hunting, hunter paces , eventing , etc I was taught some finer things. Innately as a child I was not comfortable with the whole picture of  Equitation, so as soon as I had the opportunity, I left that and learned to ride with my horse, Blue Chip Lancer, The best first horse a girl could have! Anyway,  bottom line is, it all is in relation to pressure, just given and taken away to achieve the appropriate response.

What is Pressure? Just sitting on a horse is pressure. Saddling is pressure, trailer loading is pressure. Its part of the world we live in.

For an example, If we do not add pressure behind the drive line to move forward, either on the ground or in saddle, how else do we begin the conversation to go forward in motion and in partnership. Some one has to take the lead and give direction .

Pressure is unfortunately a thing horses in the domestic world have to deal with to fit into our lives/world. Pressure however is not non existent in the wild. It is portrayed in games played from foal-hood on up. Pressure is understood by horses.  It is a herd dynamic which I value. It is their unspoken language we can only hope to tap into and use as effectively. It is not always physical contact pressure but energetic/ with intention. Going back to our prior mention of Pat Parelli, his foundation protocol, follows as closely as possible the interactions between horses, using physical and energetic intention.

I think the use of pressure is a given. It is the method and intention in with which it is used and applied that should be discussed. If the  technique  is respectful and allows for 2 way communication, and is not about the goal, but the horse, I’ll look at it.

Any tool is only as effective as the hands that hold it. As horses handlers we take a huge responsibility on to not screw up. I use many different tools in my facility because I find , as I said before, no horse is alike and some respond better to Ttouch  work , others to Parelli style, and then there is the wonderful world of in-between.  Ultimately I feel we must remain flexible in our handling styles in order to not use or  apply pressure to maintain “Control” of our direct line intention/plan for the day.   Whatever the day calls for we have to be ready to work with them not against them. Sometimes the day will totally take on a theme of its own. Use what they give you and make lemonade. I know that sounds really cliche, but it usually works out well and keeps the relationship solid. It keeps  your horse from looking at you as if to say, “So  you are a typical human.” To work in the more alternative world of NH is to not be typical or Traditional. It is to think out of the box.

In conclusion think of this:

What a great day it will be when NH is considered the “Norm”, The Traditional! The Go To way to train a race horse, or other sport horse, and start a colt.

Also A word….. Accountability.

Stay tuned for part 3~

 

My response to literature… Well, my opinion anyway.

 

My take on the NH post in the Vermont Horse Community group by Ross Jacobs/ Good Horsemanship

There is no such thing as Natural Horsemanship as a training concept. It is a brand name used for the marketing and repackaging of traditional style horsemanship. Its like Hoover has come to mean a vacuum cleaner, but it’s actually just a brand of vacuum cleaner.

 

Tom Moates wrote an excellent chapter about this in his book “A Horses Thought – A Journey into Honest Horsemanship.” You can read what Tom has to say about Natural Horsemanship by going to his web site.

 

NH started out as a term Pat Parelli adopted for his school of horsemanship that he was marketing. He used the term Natural Horsemanship as a catchy branding. Since then however, it has become synonymous with what many people consider is a type of horsemanship. It has taken on a wider meaning that extends beyond Pat Parelli’s specific systematized training. The term has become much more general in its meaning. So general in fact that most people can’t really define what NH is anymore.

 

repackaging of traditional style horsemanship”.

 

I have to respectfully disagree here. In my opinion, there is nothing Traditional about being in the Natural world. Granted there are times when for extreme cases, the last ditch effort to have a horse come around is to go to the extremes and maybe lay a horse down. I have seen the best do this and if it were not done, and the ground rules set firm, the horse, very dominant and spoiled, treated like a pet and it went bad, would be off to the meat market. The only hope would be before it hurt some one badly or itself.  That horse today is still a poster child for when  you have to go there. He is a perfect horse! Even in this extreme need to find a solution a more feeling natural approach is better than what is depicted in the Photo. 

 

NH started out as a term Pat Parelli adopted for his school of horsemanship that he was marketing. He used the term Natural Horsemanship as a catchy branding. Since then however, it has become synonymous with what many people consider is a type of horsemanship. It has taken on a wider meaning that extends beyond Pat Parelli’s specific systematized training. The term has become much more general in its meaning. So general in fact that most people can’t really define what NH is anymore.”

 

As a Parelli supporter and being very proud and thankful of it, “Natural Horsemanship” has become a very big business no doubt. Mr. Parelli is a master and has more natural ability in his little finger than I could hope for. Knowing Mr. Parelli’s more Traditional rough around the edges background in the rodeo world, he had an innate ability when opportunity knocked to see and be, a softer way. There is no way a person involved in the Parelli program who really studies it, can not take the road less traveled.   In my opinion, this is the way of Natural Horsemanship.

 

Maybe Mr Parelli, is the poster child for NH, but Hoover, is a great brand too! I say, well done and move on. No grudges, no chips on shoulders, just great appreciation for the doors that opened for all the others who followed, including me. 

 

As there is no horse alike and no human either, NH has to be, and become individualized. For me, I try to emulate my mentors, visualize moves and sayings and techniques. Ultimately though, its me, in my time, my environment, with my horse(s), so I have to make it mine, ( work for me and who I am). I practice what I preach and express this to all my students.

 

For Sable View it’s Hybrid Horsemanship, for others Good Horsemanship, or Honest Horsemanship, No Dust Horsemanship, TTouch, Clicker. these are all forms of more natural horse foundation or re-foundation work.  Regardless of the name, it needs to be  harmless , helpful, and inspiring, with results that make a positive difference in the horse world. No matter how big or small . I always say the reason there are so many clinicians out there is to suit the many different types of humans who seek help reconnecting with their horses. More times than not its the human who needs to reconnect with themselves and the horse is simple the ultimate teacher… patiently waiting for the right answer! I know this is true for me.

 

I will continue to segment the article and give my take on it in future posts.  It is a meaty article, and I appreciate how it causes me to  reflect, assess and appreciate who I am,  what I do, and how I do it.

 

 

Making new connections on a big day

11/26/12 was a big day for young Troubadour. His gelding took place mid day and this is the story of what an amazing experience it turned out to be.

I will admit I was apprehensive of the event. I had never been on hand for a castration, had  ideas of what was to happen, the process etc, but was aware of  a few not good results and this added to my  angst.  I know thousands are done but I knew what I knew and that’s what stuck.

I have to give a big shout out to my vet , Keely Henderson of Lincoln VT. She has always been great and  was very supportive to everyone concerned yesterday. Even when  Tru was a bugger to get sedatives in. LOL!

Facts:

Tru  6 months 12/11/12, Not weaned yet.

This is the absolute best thing I could have done. Clearly not the norm. The look on Keely’s face when she saw him suckle on Sarah prior to  haltering. Tough! Love you Keely but this emotional tie and support made all the difference. Ill Thank Marcy Baer for  suggesting it . I was going to  wean him a bit ago as he was really drawing on Sarah. Instead I folowed my gut, and in turn Marcy’s  words of experience ,  and asked Sarah to tough it out and beefed up her feed etc etc . I will make the break  in a month or so, as it is happening anyway naturally. But when he seems  more of an individual, Ill know its  time to let Sarah have time with her own Mom and rest up. Tru will be with Popeye and Bill. Both good “Boys” to be with. He will learn his place! Horses are the best teachers!

I have seen him grow in independence and confidence over the last  couple weeks especially. Tru looks to mom now for moral support. Some times he forgets the others in the herd have  personal bubbles! Good lessons to learn. Herd dynamics 101!! He is learning to ask permission! Now that’s a novel idea eh?

Weeks Prior to the event I had researched my YL Essential Oils to aid in the process emotionally and physically.

I had Cistus on hand for emergency bleeding. Just in case.  Other than that I had YL Myrrh to apply in the area prior to. I applied  once earlier in the AM and again just prior to vet arrival. Its purpose  in this case was as an analgesic. I also applied some YL Valor  at  poll and whithers to shoulders , rump and  heels. Grounding and  inner calm. Also on hand was YL Sacred Angel which has found a good place in my barn . YL  Sacred Angel is best described like this.  Imagine a Tsunami coming in and a surf board. You need to stay above the turmoil so you get on the surf board and ride the wave.

When  the sedative was given  we walked him to a better spot to lay him down. Towels under his head and one over his eyes the process began. I stayed by his head and stroked his neck. For me, seeing him fade to the ground was pulling to say the least. He softly fell into my hands and I followed him to the ground.

While the process began I reached for the YL Sacred Angel and applied some to my hands, held it to his muzzle and he took in a purposeful breath. After things were all done, I took the Sacred Angel and  applied drops to the towel by his nose for him to breath in.

Tru laid there for an hr  after , trying to get up once but realised he was not ready and  laid back down.  Vet left after half hr as he was so calm and sensible.

I sat with him till he began to nicker to  his mom once and answered once to Granny up at barn who was looking for  mid day hay.  I could see his eyes getting more alert and next thing  he made the effort to get up all the way. After doing so  we stood together for a good 15-20 min, then he took a step or two and rested again .  After an hr of being up we had made 2 circuits of the arena. I was following him, where ever he wanted to go. He set the pace.  We had quiet talks and  I assured him  he was doing a great job. When he got wobbly I supported him with my  body. He was very willing to accept the help. All this time Mom( Sarah) stood quietly in the temp stall, she enjoyed a flake of hay.   It was so cold, Thankfully  my one hand  was patting him constantly on his neck as we strolled, and the other tuck in my coat holding the light lead line. Burr!

This time together was a real treat, at his expense :(

I would see him “Look” at me for reassurance. It was a deep look, beyond his yrs or months  as it were. I knew I was being looked at in a new way. Sure I had taught  or assisted him in learning things, but this was a “Thanks for  being here” look. Very Different.

After an hr of  learning to walk again, it was time to let mom out with him  in arena and let them hang out together.  First thing he did was nurse. No surprise! I had to convince Sarah she needed to let him at it , no issues this time. I left them for 1/2 hr  to go warm up.

Upon my return Tru was settled quietly  in an area of arena with Sarah not too far away.

I left them again for a bit longer. On my return, now 2.5 hrs post surgery, I haltered up and  slowly we made our way to barn. A long night ahead, stall rest. Tru and Sarah hunkered down together.  The bleeding was slowing, but still coming.

I  went to feed an hr or so later and poor Tru was stiff in neck from injections and tension so  he didn’t feel much like eating. Can’t blame him. Later on I came back to do night check and brought YL PanAway oil with me . I applied a few drops to my palm and rubbed it on the injection site and opposite side as well.  I noted bleeding had stopped and I was happy to go to bed.

Next AM 11/27 I was anxious to see how he was. Warned he wouldn’t want to move,  swelling etc etc. What did I see , a little nose poking out of stall bars, looking for breakfast! He ate right up, I opened stall door to paddock and  he strolled out like nothing. Sarah went right out to walk around and he was right there.  I was impressed.  I thought to  get a cookie and  dropped 5 drops of  YL Thieves oil on it and gave it to him.  Gobbled it right up. Before turn out in big field with others I picked his feet and applied more Thieves oil there to  boost the Anti factor!

Off he went to  bother Mr. Bill and  look for trouble. He was being a real pisser.

There was no need for me to instigate movement . He was  good to go on his own. using the PanAway  relived the pain and stiffness and  becasue of the oils  mindedness, they go where they are needed. Clearly  they worked  on him systemically!

He was tired at dinner today  but still fine. I applied some more PanAway and gave a Thieves cookies before dinner.

When ever I went out to check him today, he would toddle right over.  He would before too but now he comes with a different look. A different feel. We shared his big day and built new connections.

I learned a lot about Tru in this time. He impressed me so much with his very thinking manor. LBI I’m guessing! He knew enough to not panic, or go Right brain , and just chill till he could stand. He had support from his Mom right near by in temp panelled stall, me, and the oils. When he needed his mom , she was there, and was for the whole night to offer warmth and comfort. I have no doubt all these parts made this really good outcome  what it was. Perfect!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Huricane Sandy and animal prep with YLEO’s

Thankfully, this go ’round up in VT anyway, we were spared Sandy’s wrath. There was a lot of chatter pre-storm on FB groups up here re  preparing animals emotionally for the storm. As I was not  in state for Irene pre storm, Im guessing maybe  this happened then too, but it was new to me. I was  in DC, stranded for  a week, trying to get home after taking our eldest to 1st yr college. Like that wasn’t stressful enough!

Anyway  I will discuss what I did pre and post storm with Sandy. Keeping track of hoof health along the way.

From Prior blogs on oils you probably know my “First Responder” is : The RDT( Rain Drop Therapy). Well in this instance  it was no different. I gathered all my RDT oils and  massage oils required and headed to barn to  do a couple of horses, ended up doing all 5. (Everyone slept really really well that night! LOL). I guess I needed them too. Thats a lot of oils to filter! I felt great! :)

3:30 PM 2 days pre Sandy.

The process I followed was  protocol but with a purpose of getting the oils on, not to spend a spa time as if I was doing only one. My intension was to only do a couple and then the others the next day.  Plan changed when I was on a roll and felt really  good about going  and finishing all as the next day it was to rain and water amplifies the oils.

This time the Colt got his first RDT.  Not to the full extent as a full size horse but  he got it all in small doses. Too funny, he loved all the oils! Never turned his nose up to one.  He has benefitted pprior to as Sarah has had RDT pre and post foaling. I did not  drop oils on him I dropped in hand and patted on his back. I knew he could feel his energy shifitng and he handled it really, really well. His Mom Sarah was done simultaniously. She was  expressive with  a few yawns towards the end, and her typical dancy feet.

The shetland , Mr Bill, was in heaven, loved his, and Granny Diana, settled instantly with Valor applied , the rest is icing, per usual.

Popeye was last and were it not to rain the next day I would have let him go but I really felt energized so off we went.

OH NO! I was out of Valor! Dang!!!  called to house… none on shelves! Poop!    Think fast…..”ok , get me the new oil Sacred Angel!”  promptly one of the kids ran it down to me. Why SA? I have no idea!

Honestly, it just popped to mind. My little voice ,  never lets me down. Wow, what an instant shift. He smelled it ( first time), and didnt turn away.  Proceeded with it where ever I put  Valor( A Blend of oils). Totally settled him and he was very chill for the whole treatment. Still a bit dancy in feet towards the end  but  not as much as usual. His head was  instantly lower from the start. Might be my oils of choice for him to start with.  After he was done he went out to roll.  Not typical for him to let that much go. Powerful results!

My goodness the barn smelled wonderful the AM after.  Sandy came and went, Thankfully no damage . Wind was quite loud. The horses were all tucked in barn, safe and sound. Noone looked worse for wear the  AM after. My Purpose was to boost them for the stressors of the impending winds and what ever else might have come along as a result. * Note: I was applyiing all the oils…I got my fill of supprot too! maybe more crucial  than for them :)

Since then we have been in a bit of a “Dank” spell weather wise. I have been tending to one newly barefoot horse all around,  and another  just fronts, to help them toughen ( see  Mud Season Madness). The others are just trims.

Finally the weather and ground has dried a bit, though we have more moisture coming soon.  Hooves are for sure toughened, and with use of “Purification” a YL essential oil blend, and  switching back and forth to” Thieves” also a blend, Im driving out the end of the softness in the dank corners .  Even the colt gets his treatment daily.  Everyone’s hooves are picked and brushed out well 2x a day ,  oils applied 1x day as needed. I  will be  keep the protocol up untill we get ground freeze or snow!  No MUD! Once the  shift in weather comes the protocol will ease to picking with no oils unless I see something that looks odd or soft.

Prevention is a lot less expensive and time consuming. With use of the oils and not a toxic solution, the horses are also gaining  the extra health benefits through absorbtion, smell etc.  YLEO’s are the total package Physical, emotional, and mental health in every drop!

Any questions re  the RDT or other protocol please contact me.

Stay tuned….

 

 

 

 

 

An awesome re awakening: A Ph.D and my Horsemanship Journey, what??

Less than a week ago I had a great conversation with Brian Reid of HKTWH with its intent to work out some details re schedule an event spring 2013 at Sable View. Early- mid spring — fyi :)

The call was so not about the scheduling and I’m so happy. Oh sure we discussed some  details but it was the inspiration  absorbed and  the direction the call took me in that is truely awesome.

We discussed  visions and experiences, and how things  line up for a reason. Im all over that. We discussed  past  workshops Brian had held durring th yr, and the outcomes that Brenda inabled. The thinking was very “Forward” . I like Forward!  The negative stuff can’t stick if you’re on a roll. Your horse can’t buck as bad and twist if he is moving forward. Hold him back and bottle him up and , you better be ready to deal with the energy.

As a funny off shoot story here, I had a horse long ago, Oliver ( Ollie). An Irish Sport Horse. We fox hunted, evented into Prelim. He was cool. Anyway a couple of his “things” were , He would spanish walk  naturally, not taught.  So cool. Not a typical Fox hunting thing to do!  It was so easy to  ask him to do. Going down the dirt rds, while roading hounds , all fancy..HAHAHAHA !  I would have him do it long. Most of the time it was requested as every one loved to see it!  He would also on a flat our run across a field do “Airs above the ground” and leep out of his bell boots. Litterally they would go flying almost every time. Not rip but fly!  He was so exhuberant! Just loved life! Funny to other to watch. It was not a scary thing , powerful?  You bet, awesome  in fact, but not scary. Why?? Because once I knew it was his thing, it became  ”Normal”, ( great normal right!) and most importantly it happened with forward motion.  It happend all in stride and it was done and we went on. What a horse! What a teacher!

Now back to my conversation with  BR: Durring our conversation a couple names I hadn’t thought about in a while were brought up. TED (www.TED.com) and another  Brene Brown( www.BreneBrown.com). Its funny how things go full cycle, in this case re-appearing when the student is ready. The word “Vulnerable” played a big part in our talk. We discussed its meaning in some diferent ways . Not suprising I related it to my horsemanship journey as Brian discussed how  his experience with Ms. Browns work was still unfolding new  pages to get through. It all fit.

After our call I was fully charged and went straight to my computer to search out both teaching topics. What came from that is I noted a great opportunity to share with my daughter who is a Jr in HS . The Massechesetts Conference for Woman in Boston MA. www.maconferenceforwomen.org.  Dr. Brene Brown  is one of the key Note speakers, as well as Deepak Chopra and others, WOW!  Long story short  we and a few of her school mates and teachers are going .

The word Vulnerable is probably thought of in one main light by most of society, Including me till now.  Its a strength, not a weakness.  It allows us to do what  I have been prompted to do on a few occations at clinics. Get rid of the baggage and accept you as “Enough” . This is not normal for us humans, its a tall order for a lot of us.  I have had a manta developed  for a few yrs now after a ground breaking Parelli clinic with Jerry Williams, (one of many I might add), and I still  fight the negaitve tendancies. Hmm…guess Im not perfect!  My montra is “I AM GOOD ENOUGH”  made up of very  poignant words and phrases for which the mantra is an Acronym.

If we want to be real with our horses and have our horse be real with us, we need to be real with ourselves. They can see throught us like nothing else and when we even begin to get real they respond instantly. No invisibility cloaks to hide behind. Just be you in all your “Imperfect glory”,  and YOU are enough!

Stay tuned….

 

 

Mud Season Madness: Build a barrier from the ground up

Yes it is that time of yr again in VT.  Fall came quickly and is technically not fiished but it really is.  Colors are gone, by us anyway, and the fall rains are  upon us. All good things. Leaf litter  decomposes and  add nutrients.  Rain water  readies the ground for a  restful winters nap so when spring comes and snow melt

( think we will get a lot this yr) is done we have an abundance of  growth.

All great things  in  the process but what about  the Muck. I hate muck- muck as I call it.  Every yr I say the same thing, “I have no idea how the ground ever recovers.”  Whether it be a bad fall mud season or spring thaw,  at times the ground just leaves from beneath your feet. YUCK!

So obviously, regardless of my feeling  nature still  does it thing . I have my muck  boots, our horses, some still in shoes,  some straight thru the witner for those hardy  riders. Then some bare foot yr round  or till  lalte fall. Still  they stompt through it every day.  To some extent I think its good for them but it does  have its  limits. In the wild they would have better access to  a variety of footings to keep things in better balance. Deepnding on the time of yr it , the mud , can be really drying to hooves or  get them really  moist: like this time of yr.  With grasses changing and sugar levels in flux lots of  stuff goes on  at ground level.

So let me tell you how I build a barrier for the ground up.

Rain Drop treatments  monthly thru fall (Sept Oct Nov- maybe Dec) . till the ground is frozen and  maybe a snow is on the ground. The RDT is  my first responder  for  most any issue , whether it be human or horse realated.

YL Oregano and Thyme oils on coronets and  at point of frog and in clef of frog and  bars, for those who have the softer hooves. Daily to start then weekly till I’m happy with  the feel and look . A couple drops each after a good cleaning of hoof and brush out of  loose dirt etc.  I let them stand in isle for a few momnet  after comlete to  asure a good soak in before I return them to stall, run in.

I have done this with my Sarah  and Tru , her colt. Her feet are looking soft this time of yr, not usnusual but  noticable. White hooves! :)  Over the past yr she has undergone huge physical changes and pressures on her system. Pregnancy, birth( ladies we know that joy! ), and nursing a blooming  colt for 4+ months now. Any support i can offer her , Im all over it!

Tru is doing fine, no issues, wondeful little hooves. So why oil him,Why not  !  Prevention and  note:  These oils all work physically and emotionally so  I offer him all he wants! I know  He loves his oil time! Honestly he hasn’t met an oils he hasnt liked! LOL!!

YL Thieves oil, if Thrush is an issue or an abscess for sure.   4-5 drops right on effected area and  hold hoof up for  a few seconds to allow a soak in then proceed as you would with typical  First Aid procedures. A great paste for drawing out  infection in hooves is Thieves  Tooth Paste  with an addditonal few drops of thieves mixed in as well as peppermnt oil.

This yr I plan to  apply Thieves after  shoes come off with  my Popeye, shod all around and My Diana shod in front only. My intention is to, while sole is clean and freshly exposed, to  apply a few drops and masage into sole and frog area, to ward off any potential bacteria. A protective barrier! Why not!

We all  try our best ot  keep after  hoof care but  no matter how dutiful we are , we all have those times when stuff happens.

I love haivng my YL Essential Oils on hand to help me manage those times. Hapilly I can say most of my use is preventative, and my horses love it!

If ever in Question  about any issue, I always refer to my vet and colaborate treatments as needed.

For information on  any of the oils or treatments listed here , please feel free to contact me .

www.youngliving.org/sableview